Phil and Mel In The Afternoon

Phil and Mel In The Afternoon

Phil and Mel In The Afternoon

Veterinarians nationwide are warning pet owners about the potential dangers that some types of flowers pose to cats and dogs. (Photo by Nils Jacobi/iStock via Getty Images)

When Valentine’s Day, Easter, and Mothers’ Day pop up on the calendar, most pet owners should know to keep chocolate away from their four-legged friends, especially dogs. One of our previous dogs once scarfed down some Andes chocolate mints, foil wrapper and all, at my in-laws’ house. That was a long and messy car ride home. Thankfully, Rosie survived that ordeal and lived a long life.

Did you also know that those pretty floral bouquets or arrangements you might give or get on Valentine’s Day, Easter, and Mothers’ Day can also be toxic to your pets? TrustedHousesitters consulted with veterinarians to learn about the biggest risks to pets when it comes to flowers and plants.

Roses are among the most popular flowers purchased in special occasion bouquets. While not outright toxic, roses can still pose a threat due to their sharp thorns potentially causing injuries to a pet’s mouth, throat, or paws, so be sure they are placed out of reach. Other flowers, however, can be pure poison for pets.

Veterinarians nationwide are warning pet owners about the potential dangers that some types of flowers pose to cats and dogs. They are encouraging pet owners to thoroughly check the contents of any floral arrangements they bring into their homes. Even the filler in a bouquet, such as baby’s breath, can be at least mildly harmful. Here are five flowers all pet owners should avoid bringing into their home:

  • Lilies

    White lilies on a yellow background

    Lilium candidum, a.k.a. Madonna lily. (Photo by Ana-Maria Oprisoreanu/iStock via Getty Images)

    According to the Pet Poison Helpline Toxin Trends dashboard, lilies were the most common toxin that cats were exposed to on Valentine’s Day in 2023. Certified veterinarian Amanda Takiguchi, DVM, explains: “Even eating a small amount of this flower can cause deadly kidney failure in cats. Multiple species of lilies are toxic to cats, so it’s best to avoid lilies altogether.” Lily of the Valley flowers are also highly toxic to both dogs and cats, causing seizures and dangerous heart rate and rhythm abnormalities.

  • Daffodils

    Daffodils are displayed at the Chelsea Flower Show on May 22, 2023 in London, England.

    Daffodils are displayed at the Chelsea Flower Show on May 22, 2023 in London, England. The Chelsea Flower Show, also known as the Great Spring Show, is held for five days in May by the Royal Horticultural Society on the grounds of the Royal Hospital Chelsea. (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)

    Daffodils are extremely poisonous for many pets, including cats and dogs. Your fur baby will experience severe vomiting and health concerns if they ingest any part of a daffodil, but the bulb is particularly poisonous. Keep an eye on your dog if you are in an area where they may dig bulbs up, as it can make them very sick.

  • Hydrangeas

    Hydrangea flowers inside a greenhouse.

    Hydrangea flowers inside a greenhouse on May 06, 2020 in Villa Guerrero, Mexico. (Photo by Hector Vivas/Getty Images)

    The leaves, flowers, and buds of the hydrangea plant contain a chemical known as amygdalin. If your dog ingests this popular plant, they are likely to encounter a seriously upset stomach and possible side effects like a high heart rate, high temperature, and vomiting.

  • Tulips

    Man apologizing with tulips

    Hopefully, this man is not apologizing for making a pet sick by bringing tulips into the house. (Photo by skarau/iStock via Getty Images)

    Tulips are extremely toxic to both dogs and cats. The toxin is concentrated in the bulbs, but all parts of the plant can be harmful, and ingestion can cause excessive drooling, loss of appetite, vomiting, central nervous system depression, and even cardiac abnormalities.

  • Carnations

    Carnations

    Carnations are displayed during staging day preparation for the Spring Flower Show on April 19, 2023 in Harrogate, England. (Photo by Ian Forsyth/Getty Images)

    An extremely popular Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day flower, carnations contain natural toxins that may cause mild gastrointestinal signs like vomiting and diarrhea, as well as mild dermatitis in some dogs and cats.

  • Don't Worry, Here Are Some Pet-Friendly Flowers!

    Boy holding bouquet of fields sunflowers.

    A bouquet of sunflowers is a much safer option in a home with dogs and cats. (Photo by Zaikina/iStock via Getty Images)

    For safer, pet-friendly options, get bouquets with these flowers instead:

    • Sunflowers
    • Petunias
    • Pansies
    • Marigolds
    • Snapdragons
    • Violas
    • Freesia
    • Orchids

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