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Lou Pardini, Tony Obrohta, Brett Simons, James Pankow, Walfredo Reyes Jr., Ray Herrmann, Ramon Yslas, Lee Loughnane, Robert Lamm and Neil Donell of the band Chicago perform at The Grand Ole Opry on December 15, 2021 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images)

In 1967, they were known as The Big Thing. They changed their name to Chicago Transit Authority in 1968. After the release of their first album in 1969, the band’s name was shortened to Chicago to avoid being sued by the actual mass-transit company of the same name. But it worked since the band was formed in the Windy City.

Starting with their third album, Chicago began the longstanding tradition of numbering their releases. And they’ve had a lot of them since 1969. Chicago XXXVIII comes out this summer.

Chicago has also gone through a lot of personnel through the years. Peter Cetera was one of their primary lead vocalists in the 1970s and ’80s. After launching his solo career in 1985, Cetera asked the band if they could take hiatuses after tours to let him focus on solo work.┬áThe band declined and Cetera left in the summer of 1985.

Following Peter Cetera’s departure, Bill Champlin and Jason Scheff shared most of Chicago’s singing duties well into the 21st Century. The three videos below span that transition.

  • Hard To Say I'm Sorry (1982)

    Peter Cetera sang “Hard To Say I’m Sorry,” the lead single from Chicago 16. The song went all the way to #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1982.

  • You're The Inspiration (1984)

    Another major hit for Chicago, “You’re The Inspiration” also featured Peter Cetera on lead vocals. It was the released in 1984 as the third single from Chicago 17.

  • Will You Still Love Me? (1986)

    Released in 1986, “Will You Still Love Me?” was Chicago’s first top-ten hit following Peter Cetera’s exit. Bill Champlin and new singer/bassist Jason Scheff handled the vocals. It was the second single from Chicago 18.